Tuesday 16 February 2010, 13:26 | By

Musicians Union launch ‘music supported here’ campaign

Music Business

The Musicians’ Union has launched a new campaign called ‘Music Supported Here’, which aims to equip artists with the resources to communicate copyright issues to their fans, in a new bid to convince consumers that they might want to buy music rather than nick it off the internet.

I think the hope is to demonstrate to punters why musicians need to earn off their musical output, and to convince consumers of the need to access legit pay-to-use music services by engaging them in an open debate about copyright.

Presumably, the aim is to take a more friendly, open and grass roots approach to educating music fans about copyright. Even when the big music firms have gone the education rather than enforcement route to tackle online piracy, campaigns have tended to be rather draconian – “don’t file-share because it’s illegal, it’s no different than shoplifting, you wouldn’t steal a car would you?” – and/or fronted by millionaire pop stars who aren’t great advocates for the “musicians need to be paid” argument.

Commenting on the new campaign, MU Assistant General Secretary Horace Trubridge told CMU: “Musicians are individuals with different views about music on the internet and P2P, and ‘Music Supported Here’ gives musicians a platform to discuss the issue and share ideas. That said, no one likes to be ripped-off and Music Supported Here reminds fans that it’s the musicians who want to be able to decide how their music is distributed in a digital world. And if they don’t want it to be free, don’t nick it! This movement is a concerted effort to finally put the issue centre stage. The more people who join us, the louder the noise we can make”.

The new campaign centres on a website, and a logo which artists are encouraged to use on their own official websites and social media pages. Take a look here: www.musicsupportedhere.com

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